Veto of the king to the decree on refractory priests (June 1792)

Veto of the king to the decree on refractory priests (June 1792)


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Home ›Studies› King's veto on the decree on refractory priests (June 1792)

  • Decree of the Legislative Assembly on refractory priests.

  • Decree of the Legislative Assembly on refractory priests.

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Title: Decree of the Legislative Assembly on refractory priests.

Author :

Creation date : 1792

Date shown: May 27, 1792

Dimensions: Height 31.9 - Width 20.6

Technique and other indications: (May 27, 1792) Manuscript; ink; printed letterhead with vignette

Storage location: Historic Center of the National Archives website

Contact copyright: © Historic Center of the National Archives - Photo workshop website

Picture reference: AE / II / 1265

Decree of the Legislative Assembly on refractory priests.

© Historic Center of the National Archives - Photography workshop

To close

Title: Decree of the Legislative Assembly on refractory priests.

Author :

Creation date : 1792

Date shown: May 27, 1792

Dimensions: Height 31.9 - Width 20.6

Technique and other indications: (May 27, 1792) Manuscript; ink; printed letterhead with vignette

Storage location: Historic Center of the National Archives website

Contact copyright: © Historic Center of the National Archives - Photo workshop website

Picture reference: AE / II / 1265

Decree of the Legislative Assembly on refractory priests.

© Historic Center of the National Archives - Photography workshop

Publication date: March 2016

Historical context

Power relations in the era of the Legislative Assembly

The vote on this decree, which condemns unsworn ecclesiastics to deportation, comes at a time of great tension between patriots and supporters of the king. This veto will count among the immediate causes of the revolution of August 10, 1792.

Image Analysis

Front page of a decree passed by the Legislative Assembly on May 27, 1792

The letterhead, chosen by the Assembly in 1789, contains the motto of the constitutional monarchy, indicative of the new revolutionary order. The lilies bear witness to the continuity of the monarchy. A wreath of oak leaves, symbol of power, frames motto and symbol.

On the left side appears the formula of the royal veto, "The king will examine", dated June 19, 1792, the 4th year of Liberty. Signed Louis.

Paper seal, hanging on tricolor silk lakes.

Document transcription (extract) [1]

Interpretation

The veto: "The king will examine"

This formula was provided for by the Constitution of 1791: “The king's consent is expressed on each decree by this formula signed by the king: the king consents and will have it executed. The suspensive refusal is expressed by the latter: the king will examine. The question of the royal veto was the subject of long debates, between August 31 and September 21, 1789. The importance of the discussion is explained by the circumstances: the king refuses to sanction the fundamental texts voted in August: the decrees of August 4 and the Declaration of the rights of man and of the citizen. The solution finally adopted, that of the suspensive veto for two legislatures, makes the people an arbiter between the Assembly and the king: if, on two occasions, they elect a majority in favor of the law submitted to the royal veto, they will have decided in favor. of the Assembly.

The dating: “June 19, 1792, the 4th year of Liberty. "

This formulation illustrates well the state of indecision in which the deputies still find themselves as to the calendar reform project, since the year is doubly indicated, according to the Gregorian calendar, but also according to a first form of revolutionary calendar. Before being institutionalized in September 1793, it took shape in practice as early as July 15, 1789: we are starting to date from the “2nd day of Freedom”. But the cut of January 1 is still strong in people's minds, and the deputies, on January 2, 1792, decide to count the year 1789 for a whole year. This therefore explains why the year 1792 is considered "the 4th year of Liberty".

  • Catholicism
  • Louis XVI
  • constitutional monarchy
  • refractory priests

Bibliography

Jacques GODECHOT The Institutions of France under the Revolution and the Empire Paris, PUF, 1989 François FURET, Mona OZOUF (dir.) Critical Dictionary of the French Revolution Paris, Flammarion, 1988, reed. coll. "Champs", 1992.

Notes

1. "… The National Assembly, considering that the efforts to which unsworn Ecclesiastics are constantly engaged to overthrow the Constitution do not allow these Ecclesiastics to be assumed to be willing to join the social pact, and that this would compromise salvation public than to look any longer as members of society on men who obviously seek to dissolve it; considering that the penal laws are powerless against these men, who, acting on the conscience to mislead them, almost always hide their criminal maneuvers from view of those who could repress and punish them, decrees: I. The deportation of sworn-in clergymen will take place as a measure of public safety and general police in the cases and in the forms set out below […] ".

To cite this article

Marianne CAYATTE, “Veto of the king to the decree on refractory priests (June 1792)”


Video: Part 1 French Revolution - Historie and Geshichte 008


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