Delphine Roberts

Delphine Roberts

Delphine Roberts worked for Guy Banister and later became his mistress. Roberts told Anthony Summers that during the summer of 1963 Lee Harvey Oswald worked for Banister.

On the afternoon of 22nd November, 1963, Banister and Jack Martin went drinking together. On their return to Banister's office the two men got involved in a dispute about a missing file. Banister became so angry that he he drew his Magnum revolver and hit Martin with it several times. Martin was so badly injured that he had to be detained in the local Charity Hospital.

Over the next few days Martin told friends that Guy Banister and David Ferrie had been involved in the assassination of John F. Kennedy. According to Martin, Ferrie was the getaway man whose job it was to fly the assassin out of Texas. He also claimed that Ferrie knew Lee Harvey Oswald from their days in the New Orleans Civil Air Patrol and had given him lessons on how to use a rifle with a telescopic sight.

On 25th November, Martin was contacted by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. He told them that he thought Ferrie had hypnotized Oswald into assassinating Kennedy. The FBI considered Martin's evidence unreliable and decided not to investigate Banister and Ferrie.

This information eventually reached Jim Garrison, the district attorney of New Orleans. He interviewed Martin about these accusations. Martin claimed that during the summer of 1963 Banister and David Ferrie were involved in something very sinister with a group of Cuban exiles.

Jim Garrison now became convinced that a group of right-wing activists, including Guy Banister, David Ferrie, Carlos Bringuier and Clay Shaw, were involved in a conspiracy with the CIA to kill John F. Kennedy.

Roberts said she was in the office when Banister suggested that Lee Harvey Oswald should establish a local Fair Play for Cuba Committee. This story was supported by her daughter who met Oswald during this period.

According to Delphine Roberts, Lee Oswald walked into her office sometime in 1963 and asked to fill in the forms for accreditation as one of Banister's "agents." Mrs. Roberts told me, "Oswald introduced himself by name and said he was seeking an application form. I did not think that was really why he was there. During the course of the conversation I gained the impression that he and Guy Banister already knew each other. After Oswald filled out the application form Guy Banister called him into the office. The door was closed, and a lengthy conversation took place. Then the young man left. I presumed then, and now am certain, that the reason for Oswald being there was that he was required to act undercover."

Mrs. Roberts said she was sure that whatever the nature of Banister's "interest" in Oswald, it concerned anti-Castro schemes, plans which she feels certain had the support and encouragement of government intelligence agencies. As she put it, "Mr. Banister had been a special agent for the FBI and was still working for them. There were quite a number of connections which he kept with the FBI and the CIA, too. I know he and the FBI traded information due to his former association...."


Roberts History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The Roberts surname is derived from the personal name Robert. This name was originally came from the Old German words "hrod" and "behrt," which mean "fame" and "bright." It was introduced to Britain by the Normans during the time of Edward the Confessor, and became very popular. A large number of diminutives and pet-forms were derived from this name in early times.

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Early Origins of the Roberts family

The surname Roberts was first found in Denbighshire (Welsh: Sir Ddinbych), a historic county in Northeast Wales created by the Laws in Wales Act 1536, where they were descended from Einion Efell, Lord of Cynllateh, through Howell ap Iolyn of Llangedwyn, and were directly descended from Rhodri Mawr, King of Wales.

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Early History of the Roberts family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Roberts research. Another 106 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 1585, 1665, 1679, 1648, 1657, 1606, 1685, 1649, 1718, 1682, 1722, 1719, 1722, 1606, 1685, 1679, 1684, 1660, 1723 and are included under the topic Early Roberts History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Roberts Spelling Variations

Although there are comparatively few Welsh surnames, they have a great many spelling variations. Variations of Welsh names began almost immediately after their acceptance within Welsh society. In the Middle Ages, it was up to priests and the few other people that recorded names in official documents to decide how to spell the names that they heard. Variations that occurred because of improper recording increased dramatically as the names were later transliterated into English. The Brythonic Celtic language of Wales, known by natives as Cymraeg, featured many highly inflected sounds that could not be properly captured by the English language. Spelling variations were, however, also carried out according to an individual's design: a branch loyalty within the family, a religious adherence, or even patriotic affiliations were all indicated by the particular variation of one's name. The spelling variations of the name Roberts have included Roberts, Robert, Robartes, Robarts and others.

Early Notables of the Roberts family (pre 1700)

Prominent amongst the family during the late Middle Ages was William Roberts (1585-1665), Welsh Bishop of Bangor Richard Roberts, Sheriff of Cornwall Michael Roberts (died 1679), Welsh-born, Principal of Jesus College, Oxford from 1648 to 1657 John Robartes, 1st Earl of Radnor and Viscount Bodmin PC (1606-1685), an English politician and his son, Francis Robartes FRS (c. 1649-1718), an English politician and John "Bartholomew" Roberts (1682-1722), Welsh pirate who raided ships off America and West Africa between 1719 and 1722. He changed his first name to Bartholomew after the buccaneer Bartholomew Sharp. He was the most successful pirate of the Golden.
Another 115 words (8 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Roberts Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Roberts family to Ireland

Some of the Roberts family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 73 words (5 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Roberts migration +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Roberts Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Elias Roberts, who landed in Virginia in 1624 [1]
  • Blanch Roberts, aged 20, who arrived in Bermuda in 1635 [1]
  • John Roberts, who settled in Virginia in 1638
  • Edward Roberts, who settled in Virginia in 1639
  • Ewen Roberts, who arrived in Virginia in 1643 [1]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Roberts Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Ellis Roberts, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1703 [1]
  • Alexander Roberts, who arrived in Jamaica in 1780 [1]
  • Bennet Roberts, who landed in Mississippi in 1799 [1]
Roberts Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Edmond Roberts, who landed in New York in 1802 [1]
  • Brice Roberts, who arrived in New York in 1822 [1]
  • David Roberts, who landed in New York in 1831 [1]
  • Amelia Roberts, aged 20, who landed in Key West, Fla in 1838 [1]
  • Francis Roberts, who arrived in Charleston, South Carolina in 1841 [1]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Roberts Settlers in United States in the 20th Century

Roberts migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Roberts Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • Mr. Thomas Roberts U.E. who arrived at Port Roseway, [Shelbourne], Nova Scotia on October 26, 1783 was passenger number 222 aboard the ship "HMS Clinton", picked up on September 28, 1783 at Staten Island, New York, USA [2]
  • Mr. Zachariah Roberts U.E. who settled in Canada c. 1784 [2]
  • Mr. Zachariah Roberts U.E. (b. 1756) born in New York, USA who settled in Queens County, New Brunswick c. 1784 he served with Sir William Howe, he died in 1833 [2]
  • Mr. Stephen Roberts U.E. who settled in St. Andrews, Charlotte County, New Brunswick c. 1784 member of the Penobscot Association [2]
Roberts Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • C.S Roberts, aged 32, a gentleman, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1833 aboard the ship "Legatus" from London, England
  • Louisa Roberts, aged 22, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1833 aboard the ship "Legatus" from London, England
  • Charles William Roberts, aged 3, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1833 aboard the ship "Legatus" from London, England
  • John Roberts, aged 20, a labourer, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1833 aboard the ship "Augusta" from Liverpool, England
  • Miss. Margaret Roberts, aged 6 months who immigrated to Canada, arriving at the Grosse Isle Quarantine Station in Quebec but died on Grosse Isle on 19th June 1847 [3]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Roberts migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Roberts Settlers in Australia in the 18th Century
  • Mr. William John Roberts (b. 1756), aged 31, Cornish settler convicted in Bodmin, Cornwall, UK on 14th August 1786, sentenced for 7 years for stealing yarn valued at 9 shillings, transported aboard the ship "Scarborough" on 13th May 1787 to New South Wales, Australia[4]
Roberts Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. James Roberts, British convict who was convicted in Shropshire, England for life, transported aboard the "Calcutta" in February 1803, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[5]
  • Mr. William Roberts, British convict who was convicted in Hereford, Herefordshire, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Calcutta" in February 1803, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[5]
  • Mr. William Roberts, British convict who was convicted in Middlesex, England for life, transported aboard the "Calcutta" in February 1803, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[5]
  • Mr. William Roberts, British convict who was convicted in Middlesex, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Calcutta" in February 1803, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[5]
  • Miss Charlotte Roberts, English convict who was convicted in Middlesex, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Canada" in March 1810, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[6]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Roberts migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Roberts Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Philip Roberts, aged 36, a miner, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Duke of Roxburgh" in 1840
  • Jonathan Roberts, aged 15, a labourer, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Duke of Roxburgh" in 1840
  • Mary Anne Roberts, aged 12, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Duke of Roxburgh" in 1840
  • Philip Roberts, aged 10, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Duke of Roxburgh" in 1840
  • Jane Roberts, aged 6, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Duke of Roxburgh" in 1840
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Roberts (post 1700) +

  • Kenneth Owen "Ken" Roberts (1936-2021), Welsh professional footballer from Cefn Mawr, Wrexham, Wales
  • Ernest Handforth Goodman Roberts (1890-1969), Welsh Conservative Party politician, Member of Parliament for Flintshire (1924-1929)
  • John Griffith Roberts (1946-2016), Welshfootballer who made nearly 400 appearances from 1964 to 1983, member of the Wales National Team (1971-1976)
  • Ieuan Wyn Pritchard Roberts PCKt (1930-2013), BaronRoberts of Conwy, a Welsh Conservative politician. Member of Parliament for Conwy (1970-1997)
  • Kate Roberts (1891-1985), Welsh novelist
  • Bennett "Ben" Roberts (1950-2021), Welsh actor most famous for his portrayal of Chief Inspector Derek Conway in the ITV British television series The Bill
  • John David Roberts (1932-2021), American college and professional football coach, inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1993
  • Sir Derek Harry Roberts CBE, FRS, FREng (1932-2021), English engineer, two-time Provost of University College London, 1989 to 1999 and then from 2002 to 2003
  • Wayne Roberts (1944-2021), Canadian food policy analyst and writer, best known for his role as the manager of the Toronto Food Policy Council (TFPC) from 2000-2010
  • Frank Roberts (1882-1963), New Zealand pioneer in building model trains, his models were extremely accurate and reflected the history of the New Zealand railways
  • . (Another 46 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Historic Events for the Roberts family +

Air New Zealand Flight 901
  • Mr. Michael Seaver Roberts (1932-1979), New Zealander passenger, from Wellington, North Island, New Zealand aboard the Air New Zealand Flight 901 for an Antarctic sightseeing flight when it flew into Mount Erebus he died in the crash [7]
  • Mrs. Allison Meryl Roberts (1933-1979), New Zealander passenger, from Wellington, North Island, New Zealand aboard the Air New Zealand Flight 901 for an Antarctic sightseeing flight when it flew into Mount Erebus she died in the crash [7]
Arrow Air Flight 1285
  • Mr. Bobby E Roberts (b. 1964), American Specialist 4th Class from Fort Worth, Texas, USA who died in the crash [8]
  • Mr. Wilbur Grant Roberts (b. 1957), American Staff Sergeant from Clarksville, Tennessee, USA who died in the crash [8]
Bradford City stadium fire
  • Amanda Jane Roberts (1965-1985), from Bradford who attended the Bradford City and Lincoln City Third Division match on 11th May 1985 when the Bradford City stadium fire occurred and she died in the fire
Empress of Ireland
  • Mr. William Roberts, British Assistant Steward from United Kingdom who worked aboard the Empress of Ireland and died in the sinking [9]
  • Mr. James Roberts, British Engineer's Steward from United Kingdom who worked aboard the Empress of Ireland and survived the sinking [9]
Hillsborough disaster
  • Graham John Roberts (1964-1989), English gas board engineer who was attending the FA Cup semi-final at Hillsborough Stadium, in Sheffield, Yorkshire when the stand allocated area became overcrowded and 96 people were crushed in what became known as the Hillsborough disaster and he died from his injuries [10]
HMAS Sydney II
  • Mr. Lyndon Irvine Roberts (1921-1941), Australian Stoker from North Cottesloe, Western Australia, Australia, who sailed into battle aboard HMAS Sydney II and died in the sinking [11]
  • Mr. Ronald Charles Roberts (1920-1941), Australian Assistant Cook from Middle Park, Victoria, Australia, who sailed into battle aboard HMAS Sydney II and died in the sinking [11]
HMS Cornwall
  • John Roberts (d. 1942), British Leading Stoker aboard the HMS Cornwall when she was struck by air bombers and sunk he died in the sinking [12]
HMS Dorsetshire
  • Bill Roberts, British aboard the HMS Dorsetshire when she was struck by air bombers and sunk he survived the sinking [13]
HMS Hood
  • Mr. Reginald C Roberts (b. 1919), English Ordinary Seaman serving for the Royal Navy from Minster, Kent, England, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [14]
  • Mr. Lewis G Roberts (b. 1919), Welsh Able Seaman serving for the Royal Navy from Abertillery, Monmouthshire, Wales, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [14]
  • Mr. Gordon R Roberts (b. 1913), English Able Seaman serving for the Royal Navy from Yateley, Hampshire, England, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [14]
  • Mr. Frederick C Roberts (b. 1903), English Leading Seaman serving for the Royal Navy from Fulham, London, England, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [14]
  • Mr. Ernest G Roberts (b. 1912), English Mechanician 2nd Class serving for the Royal Navy from Coxford, Southampton, England, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [14]
HMS Prince of Wales
  • Mr. Leonard Roberts, British Stoker 2nd Class, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and died in the sinking [15]
  • Mr. Lawton Roberts, British Stoker 1st Class, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and died in the sinking [15]
  • Mr. L Roberts, British Stoker, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and survived the sinking [15]
  • Mr. E Roberts, British Petty Officer Telegraphist, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and survived the sinking [15]
  • Mr. A Roberts, British Ordinary Seaman, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and survived the sinking [15]
  • . (Another 3 entries are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
HMS Repulse
  • Mr. Frederick Timothy Roberts, British Boy Signalman, who sailed into battle on the HMS Repulse and survived the sinking [16]
  • Mr. Herbert H Roberts, British Leading Seaman, who sailed into battle on the HMS Repulse and survived the sinking [16]
  • Mr. William H Roberts, British Able Bodied Seaman, who sailed into battle on the HMS Repulse and survived the sinking [16]
  • Mr. George Henry Thomas Roberts, British Engine Room Artificer 4th Class, who sailed into battle on the HMS Repulse and died in the sinking [16]
  • Mr. E N R Roberts, British Stoker, who sailed into battle on the HMS Repulse and survived the sinking [16]
HMS Royal Oak
  • H. Roberts, British Able Seaman with the Royal Navy aboard the HMS Royal Oak when she was torpedoed by U-47 and sunk he survived the sinking [17]
  • George O. Roberts, British Lieutenant with the Royal Navy aboard the HMS Royal Oak when she was torpedoed by U-47 and sunk he survived the sinking [17]
  • Thomas Owen Roberts (1919-1939), British Able Seaman with the Royal Navy aboard the HMS Royal Oak when she was torpedoed by U-47 and sunk he died in the sinking [17]
  • Frederick William Roberts (1918-1939), British Able Seaman with the Royal Navy aboard the HMS Royal Oak when she was torpedoed by U-47 and sunk he died in the sinking [17]
  • Arthur Roberts (1901-1939), British Chief Stoker with the Royal Navy aboard the HMS Royal Oak when she was torpedoed by U-47 and sunk he died in the sinking [17]
RMS Lusitania
  • Mr. Charles A. Roberts, English Able-Bodied Seaman from England, who worked aboard the RMS Lusitania and survived the sinking [18]
  • Mr. John Roberts, English Assistant Engineers' Mess Steward from Liverpool, England, who worked aboard the RMS Lusitania and died in the sinking [18]
  • Miss Annie Jane Roberts, English Stewardess from Bootle, Lancashire, England, who worked aboard the RMS Lusitania and died in the sinking and was recovered [18]
RMS Titanic
  • Mr. Frank John Roberts (d. 1912), aged 36, English Third Butcher from Farnborough, Hampshire who worked aboard the RMS Titanic and died in the sinking and was recovered by CS Mackay-Bennett [19]
  • Mr. Hugh H. Roberts (d. 1912), aged 40, English Bedroom Steward from Bootle, Lancashire who worked aboard the RMS Titanic and died in the sinking and was recovered by CS Mackay-Bennett [19]
  • Mrs. Mary Kezziah Roberts, (née Humphrys), aged 41, English Saloon Steward from Southampton, Hampshire who worked aboard the RMS Titanic and survived the sinking by escaping in life boat 16 [19]
  • Mr. Robert George Roberts (d. 1912), aged 35, English Fireman/Stoker from Southampton, Hampshire who worked aboard the RMS Titanic and died in the sinking [19]
USS Arizona
  • Mr. Walter Scott Roberts Jr., American Radioman First Class from Missouri, USA working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he died in the sinking [20]
  • Mr. Wilburn Carle Roberts, American Baker Third Class from Louisiana, USA working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he died in the sinking [20]
  • Mr. William Francis Roberts, American Seaman Second Class working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he died in the sinking [20]
  • Mr. Dwight Fisk Roberts, American Fireman First Class from Kansas, USA working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he died in the sinking [20]
  • Mr. Kenneth Franklin Roberts, American Boatswain's Mate Second Class working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he died in the sinking [20]
  • . (Another 1 entries are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Related Stories +

The Roberts Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Ewch ymlaen
Motto Translation: Go forward.


History of Roberts – Our journey so far.

Our journey started 85 years ago, when Harry Roberts first founded Roberts Radio, alongside Leslie Bidmead. In order to pay for their small factory, Leslie had to sell his beloved motorbike – but it was because of this gesture of goodwill, that Roberts could become what it is today.

1936 – The first line.

Over the next few years, Roberts produced a number of receivers which were generally designed in the traditional ‘suitcase’ format – they came with a classic loudspeaker and a ‘frame’ aerial in the lid. Far from the sleek designs you’ll see today, but interestingly still a huge part of the iconic retro designs you will see on many modern devices in the 21st century.

1939 – Through the war.

Business continued to boom during the final months of peace, and Roberts Radio persevered with production after the war broke out in 1939, until it was physically impossible to continue. In fact, radio production carried on until the supply for valves for domestic production ran out.

1941 – The silver lining.

"Her Majesty the Queen had visited the radio department and purchased a M4DC for her own personal use."

Despite the dark times, in 1941, Harry was delighted to receive a phone call from his contact at Harrods informing him that Her Majesty the Queen had visited the radio department and purchased a M4DC for her own personal use. This wasn’t the first time the royals had bought a Roberts Radio receiver – in 1939, she bought one as a present for Princess Elizabeth at the Army and Navy Stores!

1942 – Our longest standing employee joins.

A fantastic employee, Stan Vandenberghe, started working as part of the sales force team at Roberts Radio in 1942 at the age of 14. He retired earlier this year, after over 70 years of service to Roberts.

1944 – The royals.

In 1944, H.R.H. Princess Elizabeth was featured in the film, ‘Heir to the Throne’, where she can be seen switching on her Roberts portable radio. The radio plays a news item, telling Princess Elizabeth on how she is spending her 18th birthday. Then, four years on in 1948, the Queen Mother and King George VI were photographed listening to their Roberts Radio wireless set as part of a silver-wedding feature in ‘Illustrated London News’.

1956 – The Revival was born.

"In 1956, the R66 was produced and launched after Harry was inspired by the design of a handbag his wife owned."

Harry Roberts and the team had been hard at work for the last decade creating and perfecting the original ‘Revival’ radio. In 1956, the R66 was produced and launched after Harry was inspired by the design of a handbag his wife owned. The radio represented a breakthrough in British styling and design engineering – and even today, it wouldn’t look out of place in a retailer’s display.

1961 – The gold one.

In 1961, Roberts produced a one-off R200 radio with a solid gold case. Costing upwards of £26,000 in today’s money, it appeared in newspapers all over the world. Lord Boothby appeared at the 1961 Radio Show with the radio, and after receiving worldwide publicity, it was finally stolen from a department store.

1990 – The classic, reborn.

The re-introduction of the Revival was extraordinary. Back in 1990, a new Martini advert was broadcast on television featuring the R200 in red. Soon after, the phones began ringing at Roberts Radio with people asking where they could buy the radio on the Martini advert. After meeting with a case-producing factory based in Suffolk, the radio went into production. Roberts saw 3,500 sales in the first few months and the radio is still available today.

1999 – Setting the bar.

"Roberts set an industry ‘first’ with the launch of a portable DAB (Digital Audio Broadcasting) digital radio."

Roberts set an industry ‘first’ with the launch of a portable DAB (Digital Audio Broadcasting) digital radio. The world’s first portable DAB radio which was built in 1999 and was launched in May 2000 for field trials with the BBC and other home and overseas broadcasters. ‘The Classic 2000’ paved the way in the industry, and from here on, Roberts Radio would continue to innovate and succeed in its pledge of offering “Sounds for Generations”.

2007 – The rise of Smart Radio.

Roberts first Smart Radio, the WM201, is launched. This innovative radio allowed access to thousands of stations from around the world, it also streamed music files from your PC.

2012 – Limited Edition radios.

In recent years, Roberts has collaborated with other brands to create a number of ‘Limited Editions’. These include a series of Cath Kidston florals, a Union Jack Flag design for the London 2012 Olympics, and a Royal Gloss Burgundy Revival to celebrate the 60th anniversary of the Queen’s coronation.

2014 – iStream launches.

The iStream2 launched in 2014, and introduced Spotify Connect to our range of Smart Radios. Also launched in this year was the Stream 93i – a radio packed full of features, with great sound quality, the Stream 93i set a new bar for Smart Radio everywhere.

2016 – Wireless streaming takes off.

This was the year that Roberts Radio saw a new chapter in our journey. In today’s connected world, streaming is how many of us enjoy our music, and R-Line is a premium audio speaker system with wireless multi-room capability that allows our customers to do exactly that.

2017 – Spin the record to celebrate 85 years.

2017 sees Roberts celebrate our 85th birthday and we’ve taken our decades of expertise in sound and technology to introduce a new turntable, an exciting addition to a growing audio range. This year also sees the introduction of our brand new Revival RD70 and Revival Uno, growing the iconic Revival family that we’re so well known for.


Announcements

Book Alert! Order NASA and the Long Civil Rights Movement now! Link My essay “Petite Engineer Likes Math, Music” is in this collection.

Personal Statement:

Academic fields of Interest: 20th Century US space history. History of Science and science education. Currently researching NASA’s role in science education in the Spacemobile program and its influence on domestic and international K-16 science pedagogy, 1961 to 2010’s.

Summer 2019, and Winter, Spring and Summer 2020 RA for What Every1 Says, We1s, A 4Humanities Project. Website Here.

Selected Publications:

“Petite Engineer Likes Math, Music” in NASA and the Long Civil Rights Movement. Edited by Brian C. Odom and Stephen P. Waring. University of Florida Press. (2019)

Courses Taught:

Reader for History 166C: United States in the Twentieth Century (The Sixties)

Discussion Labs for History 2A World History

Discussion Labs for History 2C World History

Discussion Labs for History 4B Medieval and Early Modern Europe

Discussion Labs for History 4C Modern Europe

Discussion Labs for History 5 History of the Present

Discussion Labs for History 17A The American People, 1492 – 1837

Awards & Professional Activities:

Spacemobile: NASA as a Science Educator and Popularizer

Science History Institute, https://www.sciencehistory.org/conferences/pedagogy-popularization-and-the-public-understanding-of-science. Oct. 23, 2020. My talk starts at 5:31:03 here.

NASA and the Long Civil Rights Movement. Edited by Brian C. Odom and Stephen P. Waring. University of Florida Press (2019) received the 2019 Eugene M. Emme Astronautical Literature Award from the American Astronautical Society. Announcement found here.

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Our History

He tried anyway and his embarrassment was supreme. This event, which may seem familiar to many readers, left him determined never to attend another meeting until he knew something of parliamentary law.

Ultimately, he discovered and studied the few books then available on the subject. From time to time, due to his military duties, he was transferred to various parts of the United States, where he found virtual parliamentary anarchy, since each member from a different part of the country had differing ideas of correct procedure. To bring order out of chaos, he decided to write Robert’s Rules of Order, as it came to be called (see chart of editions below).

The twelfth, current, edition has been brought about through a process of keeping the book up to date with the growth of parliamentary procedure. All editions of the work issued after the death of the original author have been prepared by persons who either knew and worked with the original author or are connected to such persons in a direct continuity of professional association.


Career Success

After Erin Brockovich, Roberts took on some lighthearted roles, appearing in Ocean&aposs Eleven (2001) and Ocean&aposs Twelve (2004) alongside Pitt, George Clooney, Matt Damon and Andy Garcia. 

She then took on an emotionally challenging part in Closer (2004) with Clive Owen, Natalie Portman and Jude Law. Directed by Mike Nichols, the film explored the complexities surrounding two relationships marked by deceit and infidelity. Roberts then made her Broadway debut in 2006, performing in Three Days of Rain alongside Bradley Cooper and Paul Rudd. While the drama received mixed reviews, it was a huge financial success, earning more than $12 million for a 12-week run.

Roberts then starred in the film Charlie Wilson&aposs War (2007) with Tom Hanks and Philip Seymour Hoffman, receiving a Globe Globe nomination (best supporting actress) for her portrayal of an anticommunist Texas socialite who encourages Congressman Charlie Wilson to support freedom fighters in Afghanistan in their conflict against the Soviet troops.

The actress&aposs next project, 2008&aposs Fireflies in the Garden, boasted another all-star cast, including Willem Dafoe, Emily Watson and Ryan Reynolds. The family drama gave Roberts a chance to work with her husband, Moder, who served as the film&aposs director of photography. Fireflies in the Garden was shown during the Berlin Film Festival and released abroad, but was not given a theatrical run in the United States.


10 American Female Serial Killers

Serial killers come in all shapes, sizes, races and genders. In the United States, serial killers tend to be predominately white males. However, women can be (and are) serial killers as well. Although the methods and motives of female serial killers may sometimes differ from those of their male counterparts, they are often just as bloodthirsty. Here are ten of the most awful:




Number of Victims: Unknown



In the mid-1820s, LaLaurie lived with her husband and two daughters in New Orleans. They were a wealthy, high-class family &ndash but their treatment of slaves was nothing short of despicable. No concrete evidence of abuse was established against LaLaurie until 1834 in that year, there was a house fire at the LaLaurie mansion. When rescue workers arrived, they found a 70-year-old woman chained to the stove by her ankle. She later admitted that she started the fire as a suicide attempt, in order to avoid Madame LaLaurie&rsquos punishments. 



As a result of the fire, New Orleans residents began to question the horrible living conditions of LaLaurie&rsquos slaves. In the attic, authorities found a dozen maimed and starving slaves some reports indicate that LaLaurie gruesomely tortured them by sewing their mouths shut, amputating limbs, and performing other macabre experiments. 



Although the New Orleans residents were outraged, LaLaurie and her family appear to have escaped justice. There is some evidence that LaLaurie later died in Paris. 



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Fisher is usually recognized as the first American serial killer, although there were undoubtedly others before her (as exemplified by #10 on this list). She and her husband John ran a hotel near Charleston, South Carolina. Reports of missing guests soon reached the local sheriff&rsquos department, but due to lack of evidence, Fisher was left to continue her killing.

It turned out that she had poisoned her victims for material gain (once her husband made sure the guests were dead, they robbed them). Both Fisher and her husband were hanged for their crimes in 1820. 



Toppan, like many female serial killers, was trained as a nurse. In 1885, she began working at Cambridge Hospital, in Massachusetts. While employed there, she experimented on her patients for her own amusement eventually, this experimentation escalated into murder. Interestingly, while Toppan used a stereotypical feminine method of murder &ndash poison &ndash she stated that she derived sexual pleasure from watching a patient die &ndash a motive usually associated with male serial killers. 



In 1895 she began killing her landlords, and in 1899 killed her sister Elizabeth. Her killing spree came to an end when the family of one of her victims, Alden Davis, requested a toxicology report. Toppan stood trial, but was found not guilty by reason of insanity. She was committed to Taunton Insane Hospital, where she died in 1938.





Number of Victims: At least 40



Although born in Norway, Gunness spent the majority of her adult life in the United States. Like many female serial killers, Gunness dispatched her victims &ndash usually her family members &ndash for monetary gain. By the August of 1900, she had murdered two of her four children along with her first husband, and after collecting on their life insurance policies, had moved to Indiana. There she married Peter Gunness, who later met with an unfortunate &ldquoaccident&rdquo &ndash according to Belle Gunness, a sausage grinding machine fell on his head.



Following his death, Gunness advertised for suitors in the matrimonial section of the newspaper. The suitors flocked to her farm, were robbed and murdered, and never heard from again. 

In 1908, Gunness had a falling out with one of her servants, Ray Lamphere, and fired him. Shortly afterwards, her house burned to the ground. Although her remaining children were found dead in their beds, the state of Gunness&rsquos remains perplexed experts. A woman&rsquos body was found without a head but when the doctors measured the body, they realized the dead woman was only 5&rsquo3&rdquo, whereas Gunness was almost six feet tall. Nevertheless, the coroner decided the remains in fact belonged Gunness, due to dental work found at the scene. 



After the fire, Gunness&rsquos property was searched, and dozens of bodies were found buried on the premises. Lamphere was later found guilty of arson, but acquitted of Gunness&rsquos murder. 



Despite advances in DNA technology, the headless body from the Gunness farm has never been positively identified as Belle Gunness therefore, her final whereabouts and date of death are unknown. 





Number of Victims: 5-50



Amy Archer-Gilligan spent her adult life as a caretaker &ndash and murderer &ndash of the elderly. In the early 1900s, Archer and her first husband, James, moved to Connecticut and opened the Archer Home for the Elderly and Infirm. Both her first and second husbands died under mysterious circumstances (probably poisoning) and left Archer-Gilligan with large insurance payouts. With the money, Archer-Gilligan was able to continue running her nursing home/murder house. Between 1907 and 1917, there were 60 deaths in the Archer Home. Family members of the deceased grew suspicious of the mounting death toll, and eventually several bodies were exhumed and found full of arsenic and strychnine. 



Archer-Gilligan was found guilty of second-degree murder in 1919 and sentenced to life imprisonment. She died at the Connecticut Hospital for the Insane in 1962.

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Number of Victims: 3-17



Like many female serial killers, Gifford appeared to be gentle woman who cared for her sick relatives and neighbors. After a number of those under Gifford&rsquos care died, however, authorities ordered an exhumation of their bodies and found that Gifford had poisoned her victims with arsenic. Although she stood trial in 1928, she was found not guilty by reason of insanity and sentenced to spend her days at Missouri State Hospital, where she died in 1951.






Number of Victims: 11



Nannie Doss left a long line of dead husbands and relatives in her wake. Doss married her first husband at the age of 16. Their unhappy marriage produced four children, and her husband left her after he suspected (probably correctly) that Doss had murdered their two middle daughters. 



In 1929, Doss remarried &ndash this time to a man named Robert Harrelson. During their 16-year marriage, Doss murdered her two young grandsons for insurance money. After her husband raped her in 1945, she poisoned him as well. After her third husband died (again, probably by Doss&rsquos hand), Doss was able to collect the insurance money from a suspicious house fire.



In the early 1950s, Doss married her fourth husband, Richard Morton. Within a few months, she had killed her elderly mother and &ndash predictably &ndash her husband. Doss was finally apprehended after the death of her fifth and final husband, when she tried to collect two life insurance policies on him.

In 1955, Doss pled guilty to murder and was sentenced to life imprisonment. She died in Oklahoma State Penitentiary in 1965.






Number of Victims: 3-9



In the mid-1980s, Puente ran a boarding house for the elderly. Puente stole from her boarders,and eventually began murdering them (usually by poisoning). In 1985, Puente had a handyman dump a box of &ldquojunk&rdquo &ndash really a decomposing human body &ndash along a river bank where it was later found by a fisherman. 

Police began to investigate Puente and her &ldquomissing&rdquo tenants they eventually found seven bodies buried on her property, although Puente maintained that her boarders died of natural causes.

After her trial in 1992, Puente was sentenced to life imprisonment. She died in 2011 at the Central California Women&rsquos Facility in California.





Number of Victims: 7



Wuornos&rsquo troubled life has been documented in several other lists here, but the most interesting things about her crimes are her method and her motive. Unlike most female serial killers, Wuornos did not poison her victims &ndash she shot them. Her motives also did not appear financially motivated. Although she did steal some pecuniary items from her victims, she claimed that the men she killed tried to rape her, and therefore she acted in self-defense.

Throughout her trials in 1992 and 1993, Wuornos maintained this dubious argument even so, she pled guilty and was therefore sentenced to death. She died by lethal injection in 2002.






Number of Victims: 5



In the mid-1980s, the two women &ndash like so many of the women on our list &ndash were employed as nurses in a nursing home. In a deviation from the stereotypical norm, the two women murdered the elderly for sexual pleasure. Within a matter of months, they killed five patients at Alpine Manor in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Although they bragged about the murders to their coworkers, no one believed them. 



Wood&rsquos ex-husband went to the police with the story in 1988 and the two women were apprehended. In 1989, Wood reached a plea-bargain for a reduced sentence, while Graham was found guilty of five murders and sentenced to five life sentences. Wood was sentenced to 20-40 years and is incarcerated in the Federal Correctional Institution in Tallahassee, Florida.


Delphine Roberts - History

In 1834, at the mansion at 1140 Royal Street in the French Quarter of New Orleans, a fire broke out.

The neighbors rushed out to help, offering to pour water on the flames and help the family evacuate. However, when they arrived, they noticed that the woman of the house seemed to be alone.

A mansion without slaves seemed shocking and a group of locals took it upon themselves to search the house.

Wikimedia Commons Madame Marie Delphine LaLaurie

What they found would forever change the public’s perception of Madame Marie Delphine LaLaurie, once known as a respectable member of society, and now known as the Savage Mistress of New Orleans.

The rumors have muddied the facts throughout the years, but there are a few details that have stood the test of time.

First, the group of locals found the slaves in the attic. Second, they had clearly been tortured.

Uncorroborated reports from eyewitnesses claim that there were at least seven slaves, beaten, bruised, and bloodied to within an inch of their lives, their eyes gouged out, skin flayed, and mouths filled with excrement and then sewn shut.

One particularly disturbing report claimed there was a woman whose bones had been broken and reset so that she resembled a crab, and that another woman was wrapped in human intestines. The witness also claimed that there were people with holes in their skulls, and wooden spoons near them that would be used to stir their brains.

There were other rumors that there were dead bodies in the attic as well, their corpses mutilated beyond recognition, their organs not all intact or inside their bodies.

Some say there were only a handful of bodies others claimed there were over 100 victims. Either way, it cemented Madame LaLaurie’s reputation as one of the most brutal women in history.

Wikimedia Commons Drawings of Madame LaLaurie’s house as it would have been when she purchased it in 1831.

However, Madame LaLaurie was not always sadistic.

She was born Marie Delphine McCarty in 1780 in New Orleans to an affluent white Creole family. Her family had moved from Ireland to then-Spanish-controlled Louisiana a generation before her, and she was only the second generation to be born in America.

She married three times and had five children, whom she was said to attend to lovingly. Her first husband was a Spaniard named Don Ramon de Lopez y Angulo, a Caballero de la Royal de Carlos — a high-ranking Spanish officer. The pair had one child together, a daughter, before his untimely death in Havana while en route to Madrid.

Four years after Don Ramon’s death, Delphine remarried, this time to a Frenchman named Jean Blanque. Blanque was a banker, lawyer, and legislator, and was almost as affluent in the community as Delphine’s family had been. Together, they had four children, three daughters, and one son.

After his death, Delphine married her third and final husband, a much younger doctor named Leonard Louis Nicolas LaLaurie. He was not often present in her day to day life and mostly left his wife to her own devices.

In 1831, Madame LaLaurie purchased a three-story mansion at 1140 Royal Street in the French Quarter.

As many society women did at the time, Madame LaLaurie kept slaves. Most of the city was shocked at how polite she was to them, showing them kindness in public and even manumitting two of them in 1819 and 1832. However, soon rumors began to spread that the politeness exhibited in public may have been an act.

The rumors turned out to be true.

Though New Orleans had laws (unlike most of the southern states) that “protected” slaves from unusually cruel punishments, the conditions at the LaLaurie mansion were far from adequate.

There were rumors that she kept her 70-year-old cook chained to the stove, starving. There were others that she was keeping secret slaves for her doctor husband to practice Haitian voodoo medicine on. There were other reports that her cruelty extended to her daughters who she would punish and whip if they tried to help the slaves in any way.

Two of the reports are on record as being true.

One, that a man was so scared of punishment that he threw himself out of a third-story window, choosing to die rather than be subjected to Madame LaLaurie’s torture.

The third story window was then cemented shut and is still visible today.

Wikimedia Commons The mansion of Delphine LaLaurie in 2009. The second window from the left on the third floor is still cemented shut.

The other report concerned a 12-year-old slave girl named Lia. As Lia was brushing Madame LaLaurie’s hair, she pulled a little too hard, causing LaLaurie to fly into a rage and whip the girl. Like the young man before her, the young girl climbed out onto the roof, leaping to her death.

Witnesses saw LaLaurie burying the girl’s corpse, and police were forced to fine her $300 and make her sell nine of her slaves. Of course, they all looked the other way when she purchased them all back.

After Lia’s death, the locals began to doubt LaLaurie even more than they already were, so when the fire broke out, no one was surprised that her slaves were the last to be found — though there was nothing that could prepare them for what they found.

After the slaves were released from the burning building, a mob of almost 4000 angry townspeople ransacked the home, smashing the windows and tearing down doors until almost nothing remained but the outside walls.

Though the house still stands on the corner of Royal Street, the whereabouts of Madame LaLaurie are still unknown. After the dust settled, the woman and her driver were missing, assumed to have fled to Paris. However, there was no word of her ever making it to Paris. Her daughter claimed to have received letters from her, though no one had ever seen them.

Wikimedia Commons The copper plate found in Saint Louis’s Cemetery claiming Madame LaLaurie’s Paris death.

In the late 1930s, an old, cracked copper plate was found in New Orleans’ Saint Louis Cemetery bearing the name “LaLaurie, Madame Delphine McCarty,” LaLaurie’s maiden name.

The inscription on the plaque, in French, claims that Madame LaLaurie died in Paris on December 7, 1842. However, the mystery remains alive, as other records located in Paris claim that she died in 1849.

Despite the plaque and the records, it was widely believed that while LaLaurie made it to Paris, she came back to New Orleans under a new name and continued her reign of terror.

To this day, the body of Madame Marie Delphine LaLaurie has never been found.

After learning about Madame Delphine LaLaurie, read about Marie Laveau, New Orleans’ voodoo queen. Then, check out these famous serial killers.


Our History

As a 21 year old art student, Xavier Roberts rediscovers “needle molding” a German technique for fabric sculpture from the early 1800s. Combining his interest in sculpture with the quilting skills passed down from his mother, Xavier creates his first soft-sculptures.

Dexter wins a first place ribbon for sculpture at the Osceola Art Show. Xavier begins delivering his hand made Little People Originals and exhibiting them at arts and crafts shows in the southeast. He finds that many parents are happy to pay the $40.00 “adoption fee” for one of his hand signed Little People Originals.

Xavier wins a first place ribbon for sculpture with “Dexter” at the Osceola Art Show in Kissimmee, Florida. Returning home to Georgia, he organizes five school friends and incorporates Original Appalachian Artworks, Inc. Xavier and his friends renovate the L.G. Neal Clinic, a turn of the century medical facility in Cleveland, Georgia, opening “BabyLand General® Hospital” to the public.

The growing success of Xavier’s hand made Little People Originals is documented by Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, The Atlanta Weekly, and many others. There are reports that earlier editions are re-adopting for as much as 100 times their initial adoption fee.

By the end of the year almost 3 million of the Cabbage Patch Kids Toys have been adopted but demand has not been met. The Cabbage Patch Kids Toys go on record as the most successful new doll introduction in the history of the toy industry. In December, they are featured on the cover of Newsweek.


Chief Justice of the United States

During his tenure on the Court, Chief Justice Roberts has ruled that in certain circumstances local governments can be exempt from some procedural requirements of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. He has ruled that the exclusionary rule needn&apost be so broad and that some evidence can be admissible even if obtained through police negligence. Roberts wrote the majority opinion against using race as a criterion in voluntary desegregation policies, a ruling which dissenting justices said stood Brown v. Board of Education on its head.

&aposCitizens United&apos

One of his more controversial decisions came in 2010 when Chief Justice Roberts concurred with Justice Anthony Kennedy in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, which declared that corporations have the same rights as average citizens engaging in political speech. Critics alleged that the decision ignored the vast discrepancy between a corporation&aposs finances and those of the average citizen and destroyed years of reform efforts to limit the power of special interest groups to influence the voters. Supporters hailed the decision as a boost for the First Amendment because campaign finance reform&aposs efforts to force equality of free speech were contrary to those protecting speech from government restraint.

The ruling moved President Barack Obama to criticize the court&aposs ruling during his 2010 State of the Union address and that, in turn, prompted Roberts to characterize Obama&aposs choice of venue to criticize the court as "very troubling."

Obamacare and Same-Sex Marriage

Roberts made headlines again in June 2012, when he voted to uphold a mandate in President Obama&aposs Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (initiated in 2010), allowing other important pieces of the law to stay intact, including free health screenings for certain citizens, restrictions to stringent insurance company policies and permission for citizens under age 26 to be insured under parental plans.

Roberts and four other justices voted to uphold the mandate, under which citizens are required to purchase health insurance or pay a tax, a main provision of Obama&aposs health-care law, stating that while the mandate is unconstitutional, according to the Constitution&aposs commerce clause, it falls within Congress&apos constitutional power to tax. Four justices voted against the mandate.

In June 2015, Roberts ruled on two landmark legislative cases. Siding with the liberal wing of the Court and its swing vote Justice Kennedy in a 6-3 decision, Roberts reaffirmed the legality of Obamacare by supporting the law&aposs subsidy programs in King v. Burwell. However, Roberts upheld his conservative views on the issue of gay marriage and voted against the Court&aposs decision that made same-sex marriage legal in all 50 states.

Of the Court&aposs 5-4 ruling to legalize gay marriage, Roberts was bold in his protest, claiming it undermines the country&aposs democratic process. "If you are among the many Americans — of whatever sexual orientation — who favor expanding same-sex marriage, by all means celebrate today&aposs decision," he wrote in his 29-page dissent, which was released on the day of the historical announcement on June 26, 2015. "Celebrate the achievement of a desired goal. Celebrate the opportunity for a new expression of commitment to a partner. Celebrate the availability of new benefits. But do not celebrate the Constitution. It had nothing to do with it."

President Trump&aposs Travel Ban

The onset of the Donald Trump administration in 2017 brought new legal challenges, with the court agreeing to review a case regarding the president&aposs attempt to restrict entry to the United States by citizens of several Muslim-majority nations. Authoring the June 2018 majority opinion in Trump v. Hawaii, which ruled in favor of the administration, Roberts determined the president to have a "sufficient national security justification" and emphasized his "broad discretion to suspend the entry of aliens into the United States."

Roberts also took the opportunity to formally repudiate the 1944 ruling of Korematsu v. United States, which forced the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II, calling it "objectively unlawful" and "gravely wrong the day it was decided."

Early 2020 saw Roberts undertake a lesser-known responsibility in his role as Chief Justice, as he presided over the Senate impeachment trial of President Trump. Seeking to stay above the partisan tug of war, Roberts made it clear that he would not break a tie in the event of a deadlocked Senate vote, and admonished both sides for not adhering to civil discourse. Following Trump&aposs acquittal in February, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell praised Roberts for presiding with a "clear head" and a "steady hand."


Watch the video: Τα τρίποντα του Χόλις Τόμπσον στον ΟΠΑΠ